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Anatomy :: Conditions :: Treatments

Anatomy

Hip Anatomy

The hip joint is the largest weight-bearing joint in the human body. It is also referred to as a ball and socket joint and is surrounded by muscles, ligaments, and tendons. The thigh bone or femur and the pelvis join to form the hip joint.

Find out more about Hip Anatomy with the following links

Physical Examination of Hip

Physical examination provides insight to the doctor for developing an appropriate treatment plan for you. The hip joint is a "ball and socket" joint. The head of the thigh bone makes up the ball portion and the "socket" is made up by the cup shaped acetabulum of the pelvic bone.

Find out more about Physical Examination of Hip with the following link

Conditions

Hip Pain

Hip pain, one of the common symptoms patients complain of, may not always be felt precisely over the hip joint. Pain may be felt in and around the hip joint and the cause for pain is multifactorial.

Find out more about Hip Pain with the following link

Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip

Transient osteoporosis of the hip is a rare condition that causes bone loss temporarily in the upper part of the thighbone (femur). It is mostly found in young or middle aged men between the ages of 30 and 60, and women in their later stages of pregnancy or early postpartum period (following childbirth).

Find out more about Transient Osteoporosis of the Hip with the following link

Snapping Hip

The hip is an important joint that helps us walk, run and jump. The ball-and-socket joint in the hip is formed between the round end of the femur (thighbone) and the cup-shaped socket of the acetabulum (part of the hip bone).

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Hip Injuries & Tears

Muscle Strain (Hip)

A tear in the muscle fibres caused by either a fall or direct blow to the muscle, overstretching and overuse injury is called a strain.

Find out more about Muscle Strain (Hip) with the following link

Hip Bursitis

Hip bursitis is a painful condition caused by inflammation of a bursa in the hip. Bursae are fluid filled sacs present in joints between bone and soft tissue to reduce friction and provide cushioning during movement.

Find out more about Hip Bursitis with the following links

Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI)

Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI), often referred to as hip impingement is a condition where there is too much friction in the hip joint from bony irregularities causing pain and decreased range of hip motion.

Find out more about Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) with the following links

Avascular Necrosis

Avascular necrosis, also known as AVN and osteonecrosis, is a disease caused from inadequate blood supply to the bone which leads to bone death.

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Hip Fracture

The hip joint is a “ball and socket” joint. The “ball” is the head of the femur, or thigh bone, and the “socket” is the cup shaped acetabulum.

Find out more about Hip Fracture with the following link

Hip Dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is a condition which is seen in infants and young children as a result of developmental problems in the hip joint. The femur (thigh bone) partially or completely slips out of the hip socket causing dislocation at the hip joint.

Find out more about Hip Dysplasia with the following link

Gluteus Medius Tear

Gluteus medius is one of 3 muscles in the buttocks and is situated on the outer surface of the hip. The function of the gluteus medius is to assist with pelvis stability, hip abduction, along with internal and external rotation of the hip.

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Hip Labral Tear

Labrum is a ring of strong fibrocartilaginous tissue lining around the socket of the hip joint. Labrum serves many functions where it acts as shock absorber, lubricates the joint, and distributes the pressure equally.

Find out more about Hip Labral Tear with the following link

Chondral Lesions or Injuries

The hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing joints in the body, formed by the thigh bone or femur and the acetabulum of the pelvis. It is a ball and socket joint with the head of the femur as the ball and the pelvic acetabulum forming the socket.

Find out more about Chondral Lesions or Injuries with the following link

Hip Instability

The hip plays an important role in supporting the upper body weight while standing, walking and running, and hip stability is crucial for these functions.

Find out more about Hip Instability with the following link

Loose Bodies

Loose bodies are small loose fragments of cartilage or a bone that float around the joint. The loose bodies can cause pain, swelling, locking and catching of the joint. Loose bodies occur if there is bleeding within the joint, death of tissues lining the joints associated with tuberculosis, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis.

Find out more about Loose Bodies with the following link

Hip Arthritis

Osteoarthritis of the Hip

Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative joint disease is the most common form of arthritis. It occurs most often in older people. This disease affects the tissue covering the ends of bones in a joint (cartilage).

Find out more about Osteoarthritis of the Hip with the following link

Inflammatory Arthritis of the Hip

Inflammation of the joints is referred to as arthritis. The inflammation arises when the smooth covering (cartilage) at the end surfaces of the bones wears away.

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Childhood Hip Problems

Developmental Dysplasia

Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common disorder that is seen in infants and young children.

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Legg Calve Perthes Disease

Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCPD) or Perthes disease is a disorder of the hip that affects children, usually between the ages of 4 and 10. It usually involves one hip, although it can occur on both sides in some children.

Find out more about Legg Calve Perthes Disease with the following link

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a common hip disorder in adolescents causing slippage or separation of the femoral head (ball at the upper end of the femur bone) from the weakened epiphyseal growth plate (growing end of the bone).

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Irritable Hip

Irritable hip, also known as acute transient synovitis is a common disorder of childhood characterised by onset of hip pain and limping. The term transient means that it does not usually last long.

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Treatements

Non-Surgical Treatments

Non-Surgical Hip Treatments

Injuries to the hip can be caused by degenerative disease such as arthritis, traumatic injuries and sports injuries. These conditions may affect the bones & joints and impair the mobility as well as the quality of life of the patients.

Find out more about Non-surgical hip treatments with the following link

Hip Injections

Hip joint injections involve injecting medicine directly into the hip joint to diagnose the source of pain or treat pain due to conditions such as arthritis, injury or mechanical stress of the hip joint.

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Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy or physical therapy is an exercise program that helps you to improve movement, relieve pain, encourage blood flow for faster healing, and restore your physical function and fitness level. The main aim of physical therapy is to make your daily activities, such as walking, getting in and out of bed, or climbing stairs, easier.

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Platelet-rich Plasma Therapy

Platelet-rich plasma injection is a revolutionary new treatment for treating injuries or conditions of the hip. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is concentrated portion of blood plasma enriched with platelets or containing more amounts of platelets.

Find out more about Platelet Rich Plasma Therapy with the following link

Shock Wave Therapy

Shock wave therapy is application of the sound waves to treat musculoskeletal conditions and sports-related injuries.

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Surgical Treatments

Arthroscopy

Hip arthroscopy is an excellent surgery that has helped many patients restore their hip function and experience decreased pain originating from their hip.

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Hip Replacement

Total Hip Replacement (THR) procedure replaces all or part of the hip joint with an artificial device (prosthesis) to eliminate pain and restore joint movement.

Find out more about Total Hip Replacement (THR) with the following links

Patient Specific Hip Options

The hip is a ball and socket joint which connects your thigh and hip bone. It is a crucial part of your anatomy that bears a large amount of force. Your hip may be subjected to injuries, damage,strains, inflammation, dislocation or fractures due to sports activities, overuse, falls and accidents.

Find out more about Patient Specific Hip Options with the following link

Hip Resurfacing

Hip resurfacing or bone conserving procedure replaces the acetabulum (hip socket) and resurfaces the femoral head. This means the femoral head has some or very little bone removed and replaced with the metal component. This spares the femoral canal.

Find out more about Hip Resurfacing with the following links

Others

Coming soon

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Health & Safety

Pre-op and Post-op Hip Guidelines

Planning for your hip surgery prepares you for the operation and helps to ensure a smooth surgery and easier recovery. Here are certain pre-operative and post-operative guidelines which will help you prepare for hip surgery.

Find out more about Pre-op and Post-op Hip Guidelines with the following link

Caregivers Guide for the Hip

When your friend or loved one has undergone a hip replacement surgery, as a caregiver, you will play an important role in his/her recovery.

Find out more about Caregivers Guide for the Hip with the following link

Hip Fracture Prevention

Hip fractures refer to any kind of breakage or damage in the thigh bone (femur). People over the age of 65, especially women, are highly vulnerable to hip fractures. You will require assistance after hip fractures from family members as well as health professionals and may also be required to be admitted to the hospital for further assistance.

Find out more about Hip Fracture Prevention with the following link

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